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Off-premise alcohol purchasing in Australia: Variations by age group, income level and annual amount purchased
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). La Trobe University, Australia.
Number of Authors: 4
2017 (English)In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 36, no 2, 210-219 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction and Aims. To delineate what type and how much alcohol is purchased from different types of off-licence premises and how this varies across demographic sub-groups, as a basis for public debate and decisions on pricing and planning policies to reduce alcohol-related harm in Australia. Design and Methods. The data on alcohol purchasing from off-licence premises are taken from the Australian Alcohol Consumption and Purchasing surveya nationally representative landline and mobile telephone survey in 2013 on the experiences with alcohol consumption and purchasing of 2020 Australians aged 16+. The present analysis uses data from 1730 respondents who purchased alcohol from off-licence premises in the previous 6months. Results. The majority (54%) of alcohol purchased from off-licence premises was sold from liquor barns (large warehouse-style alcohol stores), with bottle shops (31%) the second most common outlet. Cask wine was the cheapest alcohol available at off-licence premises in Australia. Respondents in higher alcohol purchasing quintiles and with those with lower income purchased a higher percentage of cheaper alcohol in their total volume of purchasing than lower purchasing quintiles and those with middle and higher income, and younger respondents purchased more expensive alcohol than older age groups. Discussion and Conclusions. A minimum unit price or increasing alcohol taxes may effectively reduce alcohol purchasing for lower income heavy alcohol purchasers and older age groups from off-licence premise sources, and may be less effective on younger age groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 36, no 2, 210-219 p.
Keyword [en]
alcohol, purchasing behaviour, off-premise, price, alcohol policy
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-142442DOI: 10.1111/dar.12402ISI: 000397819700010PubMedID: 27219829OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-142442DiVA: diva2:1096864
Available from: 2017-05-19 Created: 2017-05-19 Last updated: 2017-05-19Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf