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Assistance networks in seafood trade - A means to assess benefit distribution in small-scale fisheries
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
Number of Authors: 2
2017 (English)In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 78, 196-205 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article addresses the connections between value chain actors in the tropical-marine small-scale fisheries of Zanzibar, Tanzania, to contribute to a better understanding of the fisher-trader link and how connections in general might feed into livelihood security. A sample of 168 fishers and 130 traders was taken across 8 sites through questionnaires and observations. The small-scale fishery system is mapped using a value chain framework both traditionally and from a less economic point of view where the assistance-exchange networks between fishery actors add another layer of complexity. Auxiliary actors previously disregarded emerge from the latter method thus shedding light on the poorly understood distribution of benefits from seafood trade. Female actors participate quite differently, relative to males in the market system, detached from high-value links such as the tourist industry, and access to predetermined or secured sales deals. Data shows that the fisher-trader link is not as one-sided as previously presented. In fact it has a more symbiotic exchange deeply nested in a broader trading and social system. Expanding the analysis from this link by taking a further step downstream highlights traders' own sales arrangements and the social pressures they are under in realizing them. A complex picture, inclusive of diversified perspectives, on interactions in the market place is presented, as well as a. reflection on the remaining critical question: how to integrate this type of data into decisions about future fisheries governance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 78, 196-205 p.
Keyword [en]
Value chain framework, Fisher-trader link, Livelihood security, Gender, Societal system
National Category
Social and Economic Geography Political Science Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-142608DOI: 10.1016/j.marpol.2017.01.025ISI: 000397351500025OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-142608DiVA: diva2:1097293
Available from: 2017-05-22 Created: 2017-05-22 Last updated: 2017-05-22Bibliographically approved

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Drury O'Neill, ElizabethCrona, Beatrice
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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