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Assistance networks in seafood trade - A means to assess benefit distribution in small-scale fisheries
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3557-6571
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1617-4067
Number of Authors: 22017 (English)In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 78, p. 196-205Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article addresses the connections between value chain actors in the tropical-marine small-scale fisheries of Zanzibar, Tanzania, to contribute to a better understanding of the fisher-trader link and how connections in general might feed into livelihood security. A sample of 168 fishers and 130 traders was taken across 8 sites through questionnaires and observations. The small-scale fishery system is mapped using a value chain framework both traditionally and from a less economic point of view where the assistance-exchange networks between fishery actors add another layer of complexity. Auxiliary actors previously disregarded emerge from the latter method thus shedding light on the poorly understood distribution of benefits from seafood trade. Female actors participate quite differently, relative to males in the market system, detached from high-value links such as the tourist industry, and access to predetermined or secured sales deals. Data shows that the fisher-trader link is not as one-sided as previously presented. In fact it has a more symbiotic exchange deeply nested in a broader trading and social system. Expanding the analysis from this link by taking a further step downstream highlights traders' own sales arrangements and the social pressures they are under in realizing them. A complex picture, inclusive of diversified perspectives, on interactions in the market place is presented, as well as a. reflection on the remaining critical question: how to integrate this type of data into decisions about future fisheries governance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 78, p. 196-205
Keywords [en]
Value chain framework, Fisher-trader link, Livelihood security, Gender, Societal system
National Category
Social and Economic Geography Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries
Research subject
Sustainability Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-142608DOI: 10.1016/j.marpol.2017.01.025ISI: 000397351500025OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-142608DiVA, id: diva2:1097293
Available from: 2017-05-22 Created: 2017-05-22 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Catching values of small-scale fisheries: A look at markets, trade relations and fisher behaviour
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Catching values of small-scale fisheries: A look at markets, trade relations and fisher behaviour
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis explores small-scale fisheries trade, markets and the accompanying relationships. It does so to understand how they contribute to human wellbeing and ecosystem health through fisher's behaviour in the marine environment. The capacity of small-scale fisheries to provide for fisherfolk and wider society is currently challenged by human induced ecological threats such as overexploitation and climate change. Small-scale fisheries are increasingly incorporated into the global trading system, which in part drive these ecological changes. At the same time these fisheries are important providers of food and livelihood security for millions of people worldwide. How to realise better fishery governance approaches and enactment is therefore paramount. This thesis attempts to address knowledge gaps in governance and research that centre around the market and actors within it- an area little included in governing fisheries. I draw on the value chain concept and use a mixed methods approach to address three gaps. First, the structure and functioning of small-scale fishery markets and relations. Second, how benefits are distributed in the market and affected by trade relations. Third, I examine how relations and benefit distributions influence fishing behaviour. Case studies are used throughout this thesis drawing on empirical work done in Zanzibar, Tanzania and Iloilo, Philippines. The role of global seafood markets is additionally recognised as a driver of change in all four papers of the thesis. Paper I shows that extending the value chain to combine economic and informal exchanges identifies a wider range of fishery-related sources for human wellbeing within seafood trade. It also highlights more marginal players. Paper II demonstrates how actor's abilities to access economic benefits are impacted by local gender roles and social relations. But these intersect with their value chain position and end-markets. In Paper III local norms appear to play a role in fishing behaviour, more so than market incentives. These dynamics are explored through behavioural economic experiments. Finally Paper IV examines how patronage can have contradictory influences for fisherfolk vulnerability and adaptability. It can also create tensions for overall system resilience when considered at different scales. Overall the thesis contributes to a better understanding of the local to global drivers and interactions in small-scale fisheries trade. The thesis also provides insights into some of the factors influencing the distribution of fishery-related benefits. These aspects have all been cited as vital for designing strategies for improving the wellbeing of people reliant on fisheries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, 2018. p. 64
Keywords
small-scale fisheries, value chains, gender, seafood trade, global markets, patron-client, human wellbeing, benefits, markets, local social dynamics
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Sustainability Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-160827 (URN)978-91-7797-452-9 (ISBN)978-91-7797-453-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-11-22, Vivi Täckholmsalen (Q-salen), NPQ-huset, Svante Arrhenius väg 20, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, 1425704Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 3: Manuscript. Paper 4: Manuscript.

Available from: 2018-10-30 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2018-11-01Bibliographically approved

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