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Psychotropic drugs and the risk of fall injuries, hospitalisations and mortality among older adults
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
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Number of Authors: 6
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 32, no 4, 414-420 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

To investigate whether psychotropics are associated with an increased risk of fall injuries, hospitalizations, and mortality in a large general population of older adults.

Methods

We performed a nationwide matched (age, sex, and case event day) case–control study between 1 January and 31 December 2011 based on several Swedish registers (n = 1,288,875 persons aged ≥65 years). We used multivariate conditional logistic regression adjusted for education, number of inpatient days, Charlson co-morbidity index, dementia and number of other drugs.

Results

Antidepressants were the psychotropic most strongly related to fall injuries (ORadjusted: 1.42; 95% CI: 1.38–1.45) and antipsychotics to hospitalizations (ORadjusted: 1.22; 95% CI: 1.19–1.24) and death (ORadjusted: 2.10; 95% CI: 2.02–2.17). Number of psychotropics was associated with increased the risk of fall injuries, (4 psychotropics vs 0: ORadjusted: 1.53; 95% CI: 1.39–1.68), hospitalization (4 psychotropics vs 0: ORadjusted: 1.27; 95% CI: 1.22–1.33) and death (4 psychotropics vs 0: ORadjusted: 2.50; 95% CI: 2.33–2.69) in a dose–response manner. Among persons with dementia (n = 58,984), a dose–response relationship was found between number of psychotropics and mortality risk (4 psychotropics vs 0: ORadjusted: 1.99; 95% CI: 1.76–2.25).

Conclusions

Our findings support a cautious prescribing of multiple psychotropic drugs to older patients. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 32, no 4, 414-420 p.
Keyword [en]
aged, dementia, psychotropic drugs, Sweden
National Category
Geriatrics Gerontology, specializing in Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-143624DOI: 10.1002/gps.4483ISI: 000399300400006PubMedID: 27113813OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-143624DiVA: diva2:1103300
Available from: 2017-05-30 Created: 2017-05-30 Last updated: 2017-05-30Bibliographically approved

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GeriatricsGerontology, specializing in Medical and Health SciencesPsychiatry

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Citation style
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