Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Arsenic concentrations in local aromatic and high-yielding hybrid rice cultivars and the potential health risk: a study in an arsenic hotspot
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 5
2017 (English)In: Environmental Monitoring & Assessment, ISSN 0167-6369, E-ISSN 1573-2959, Vol. 189, no 4, 184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The presence of high levels of arsenic (As) in rice fields has negative effects on the health of those consuming rice as their subsistence food. This study determined the variation in total As concentration in local aromatic rice (LAR) (kalijira) and two high-yielding varieties (HYVs) (BRRI dhan 32 and BRRI dhan 28) grown in paddy fields in Matlab, Bangladesh, an As hotspot with elevated As levels in groundwater. Mature rice grain samples and soil samples were collected from different paddy fields, and the As concentrations in both the de-husked grains and the husks of the three rice cultivars were analysed to identify the safest of the three cultivars for human consumption. The results showed that the total As concentration was higher (0.09-0.21 mg As kg(-1)) in the de-husked grains of LAR than in the husks, while the opposite was found for the HYVrice. Moreover, the As concentration in soil samples was 2 to 5-fold higher for the LAR than for the HYVs, but the As accumulation factor (AF) was lower in the LAR (0.2-0.4%) than in the HYVs (0.9-1%). Thus, LAR can be considered the safest of the three cultivars for human consumption owing to its low AF value. Furthermore, due to the low AF, growing LAR instead of HYVs in soils with slightly elevated As levels could help improve the food safety level in the food chain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 189, no 4, 184
Keyword [en]
Aromatic rice, Arsenic, As uptake, Accumulation factor, Bangladesh, Food chain, Husk, Soil
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-143623DOI: 10.1007/s10661-017-5889-3ISI: 000398714200050PubMedID: 28342052OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-143623DiVA: diva2:1103331
Available from: 2017-05-30 Created: 2017-05-30 Last updated: 2017-05-30Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Sandhi, ArifinGreger, MariaLandberg, Tommy
By organisation
Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences
In the same journal
Environmental Monitoring & Assessment
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 8 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf