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Memory for faces and voices varies as a function of sex and expressed emotion
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Cognitive psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 6, e0178423Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigated how memory for faces and voices (presented separately and in combination) varies as a function of sex and emotional expression (anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and neutral). At encoding, participants judged the expressed emotion of items in forced-choice tasks, followed by incidental Remember/Know recognition tasks. Results from 600 participants showed that accuracy (hits minus false alarms) was consistently higher for neutral compared to emotional items, whereas accuracy for specific emotions varied across the presentation modalities (i.e., faces, voices, and face-voice combinations). For the subjective sense of recollection (“remember” hits), neutral items received the highest hit rates only for faces, whereas for voices and face-voice combinations anger and fear expressions instead received the highest recollection rates. We also observed better accuracy for items by female expressers, and own-sex bias where female participants displayed memory advantage for female faces and face-voice combinations. Results further suggest that own-sex bias can be explained by recollection, rather than familiarity, rates. Overall, results show that memory for faces and voices may be influenced by the expressions that they carry, as well as by the sex of both items and participants. Emotion expressions may also enhance the subjective sense of recollection without enhancing memory accuracy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 12, no 6, e0178423
Keyword [en]
face, face recognition, memory, emotions, fear, happiness, attention, vocalization
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-143846DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0178423OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-143846DiVA: diva2:1104957
Note

This research was supported by the Swedish Research Council awarded to PL (2012-801).

Available from: 2017-06-02 Created: 2017-06-02 Last updated: 2017-06-02

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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