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Improving participatory resilience assessment by cross-fertilizing the Resilience Alliance and Transition Movement approaches
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0158-164X
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0706-9233
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0173-0112
Number of Authors: 42017 (English)In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The concept of resilience is currently being widely promoted and applied by environmental and development organizations. However, their application of resilience often lacks theoretical backing and evaluation. This paper presents a novel cross-fertilization of two commonly used approaches for applying resilience thinking: the grassroots movement of Transition Towns and the Resilience Alliance's Resilience Assessment. We compared these approaches through a text analysis of their key handbooks and combined them in a series of participatory workshops with a local partner active in the Transition Movement. Our results demonstrate that despite sharing a number of key features, these two approaches have complementary strengths and weaknesses. Strengths of the Transition Movement include its motivating overarching narrative of the need to transform in response to global sustainability challenges, as well as practical tools promoting learning and participation. The Resilience Assessment's conceptual framework and structured process generated context-specific understanding of resilience, but provided little guidance on navigating transformation processes. Combining the Resilience Assessment's theory on complex systems with the Transition Movement's methods for learning also generated synergies in fostering complexity thinking. Based on these findings, we believe that integrating strengths from both approaches could be widely useful for practitioners seeking to apply resilience for sustainable development. Our study also highlights that methods for assessing resilience can be improved by combining insights from science and practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 22, no 1, article id 28
Keywords [en]
sustainability science, sustainable development, transdisciplinary research, transformation, Transition Towns
National Category
Biological Sciences Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Sustainability Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-143853DOI: 10.5751/ES-09051-220128ISI: 000399397700035OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-143853DiVA, id: diva2:1105739
Available from: 2017-06-05 Created: 2017-06-05 Last updated: 2018-10-15Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Advancing Resilience Practice: Bridging social-ecological resilience theory and sustainable development practice
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Advancing Resilience Practice: Bridging social-ecological resilience theory and sustainable development practice
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis investigates the application of resilience thinking in different real-world settings and research-practice interfaces, for example in the context of natural resource management, local government planning and food systems. The number of cases of resilience practice are growing, including resilience assessments, planning and action, but there are still few scientific studies and even less synthesis across cases. This thesis describes existing cases of resilience practice, in natural resource management in Australia (Paper I) and across different international cases (Paper II), and experiments with new methods and approaches for improving resilience practice, based on pilot projects of co-production in Sweden (Paper III and Paper IV). The results confirm that resilience practice can contribute to the understanding and adaptive governance of complex social-ecological systems, but is weak in addressing the need for transformations, particularly for the sake of the resilience of Earth systems and global sustainability. The results also highlight practical strategies for engaging with complexity and novel approaches to enhance the potential of local-regional resilience practice to align with global sustainability concerns. The thesis as a whole sheds light on the field of resilience practice, by outlining different approaches, contexts and purposes and contributes to building transdisciplinary networks and relationships in multiple arenas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, 2018. p. 61
Keywords
Complex adaptive systems, Local and regional planning, Resilience thinking, Social-ecological systems, Transdisciplinarity
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Sustainability Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-160935 (URN)978-91-7797-476-5 (ISBN)978-91-7797-477-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-11-29, Vivi Täckholmsalen (Q-salen), NPQ-huset, Svante Arrhenius väg 20, Stockholm, 09:30 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 2: Manuscript. Paper 4: Manuscript.

Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-10-15 Last updated: 2018-10-29Bibliographically approved

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