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Estimating the need for palliative care at the population level: A cross-national study in 12 countries
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). French National Observatory on End-of-Life Care, France.
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Number of Authors: 15
2017 (English)In: Palliative Medicine: A Multiprofessional Journal, ISSN 0269-2163, E-ISSN 1477-030X, Vol. 31, no 6, 526-536 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: To implement the appropriate services and develop adequate interventions, detailed estimates of the needs for palliative care in the population are needed.

Aim: To estimate the proportion of decedents potentially in need of palliative care across 12 European and non-European countries.

Design: This is a cross-sectional study using death certificate data.

Setting/participants: All adults (18years) who died in 2008 in Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Hungary, Italy, Spain (Andalusia, 2010), Sweden, Canada, the United States (2007), Korea, Mexico, and New Zealand (N=4,908,114). Underlying causes of death were used to apply three estimation methods developed by Rosenwax et al., the French National Observatory on End-of-Life Care, and Murtagh et al., respectively.

Results: The proportion of individuals who died from diseases that indicate palliative care needs at the end of life ranged from 38% to 74%. We found important cross-country variation: the population potentially in need of palliative care was lower in Mexico (24%-58%) than in the United States (41%-76%) and varied from 31%-83% in Hungary to 42%-79% in Spain. Irrespective of the estimation methods, female sex and higher age were independently associated with the likelihood of being in need of palliative care near the end of life. Home and nursing home were the two places of deaths with the highest prevalence of palliative care needs.

Conclusion: These estimations of the size of the population potentially in need of palliative care provide robust indications of the challenge countries are facing if they want to seriously address palliative care needs at the population level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 31, no 6, 526-536 p.
Keyword [en]
Palliative care, needs assessment, end-of-life care, cause of death
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Geriatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-143435DOI: 10.1177/0269216316671280ISI: 000400196900004PubMedID: 27683475OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-143435DiVA: diva2:1107233
Available from: 2017-06-09 Created: 2017-06-09 Last updated: 2017-06-09Bibliographically approved

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Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI)
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Palliative Medicine: A Multiprofessional Journal
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and EpidemiologyGeriatrics

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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