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How traders and their institutional arrangements influence the social- ecological sustainability of small-scale fisheries: The case of a seafood supply chain in Baja California Sur, Mexico
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

The production of Small-Scale Fisheries (SSFs) satisfies seafood demand and is an important contributor to people’s livelihoods around the world. The disconnection between supply and demand can influence sustainability of SSFs by decreasing actors’ ability to respond to environmental and market changes. In developing contexts, such as many Mexican fishing communities, fishers and traders (fish buyers) establish self-governing instructional arrangements that connect local fish production with demand across scales. This thesis studies the mediating role of traders’ institutional arrangements for the social-ecological (SES) sustainability of a supply chain. A mixed-method approach is applied to a study case in Baja California Sur, Mexico, that includes interviews, surveys, participant observation and a multi-level network analysis. This thesis develops an analytical framework that combines empirical observations with network structures of the supply chain. It is used to identify and quantify self-governing institutions; show social-ecological interdependencies; and hypothesize their sustainability outcomes. The results reveal various types of traders, with different functions in the supply chain. Overall, the structural composition of the supply chain could enhance SES sustainability. I argue that traders’ self-governing institutional arrangements have potential to promote SES sustainability by increasing adaptive capacity. However, this can threaten long-term sustainability if overexploitation is promoted. Traders’ incentives might be key to achieving or impeding sustainability. This investigation contributes to understanding the role of traders in SSF supply chains and yields insights for future research and sustainability interventions. It presents an analytical framework to study sustainability in supply chains from a relational perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
Keywords [en]
Small-Scale Fisheries, social-ecological systems, networks, trade, supply chain, adaptability, sustainability, institutions, social-ecological systems, networks, trade, supply chain, adaptability, sustainability, institutions
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-144491OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-144491DiVA, id: diva2:1113403
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Available from: 2019-06-24 Created: 2017-06-21 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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