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Possible benefits of tomato juice consumption: a pilot study on irradiated human lymphocytes from healthy donors
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Number of Authors: 10
2017 (English)In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 16, 27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate much of the DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation. Among carotenoids, lycopene and beta-carotene, present in tomato juice, are known to be strong radical scavengers. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of tomato juice intake on the levels of DNA damage and oxidative stress in human whole blood induced by in vitro exposure to X-rays. Methods: Ten healthy adults were asked to drink 190 g of tomato juice, containing 17 mg lycopene and 0.25 mg beta-carotene, per day for 3 weeks and then refrain from drinking it for 3 weeks. Peripheral whole blood samples were collected before and after the intake period of tomato juice and after the washout period. The blood samples were exposed in vitro to X-ray doses of 0, 0.1, 0.5, and 2 Gy. Cytogenetic damage was measured using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay and the dicentrics (DIC) assay. The level of oxidative stress was determined using serum 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) and plasma reactive oxygen metabolite-derived compounds (d-ROMs). The concentration of carotenoids in plasma was measured at the three time points. Results: The levels of 8-oxo-dG tended to decrease during the intake period and increase during the washout period. A non-significant inverse correlation was noted between the plasma concentration of lycopene plus beta-carotene and the level of 8-oxo-dG (P = 0.064). The radiation-induced MN and DIC frequencies increased in a dose-dependent manner, and when compared at the same dose, theMN and DIC frequencies decreased during the intake period compared with those at baseline and then increased during the washout period. The results suggest that continuous tomato juice consumption non-significantly decreases extracellular 8-oxo-dG, d-ROMs, and MN. Tomato juice intake had minimal or no effect on radiation-induced 8-oxo-dG and d-ROMs. For most radiation doses, continuously tomato juice intake lowered the levels of MN and DIC. Conclusion: Tomato juice consumption may suppress human lymphocyte DNA damage caused by radiation, but further examination is required.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 16, 27
Keyword [en]
Reactive oxygen species, Tomato juice, Lycopene, beta-carotene, Radioprotective effect, Human lymphocytes
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-144838DOI: 10.1186/s12937-017-0248-3ISI: 000401179100001PubMedID: 28494764OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-144838DiVA: diva2:1120170
Available from: 2017-07-05 Created: 2017-07-05 Last updated: 2017-07-05Bibliographically approved

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Haghdoost, Siamak
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Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute
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