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Use of Medications of Questionable Benefit During the Last Year of Life of Older Adults With Dementia
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Catholic University of Rome, Italy.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). University of Milan, Italy.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
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Number of Authors: 6
2017 (English)In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 18, no 6, 551.e1-551.e7 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To investigate the prevalence and factors associated with the use of medications of questionable benefit throughout the final year of life of older adults who died with dementia. Design: Register-based, longitudinal cohort study. Setting: Entire Sweden. Participants: All older adults (>= 75 years) who died with dementia between 2007 and 2013 (n = 120,067). Measurements: Exposure to medications of questionable benefit was calculated for each of the last 12 months before death, based on longitudinal data from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. Results: The proportion of older adults with dementia who received at least 1 medication of questionable benefit decreased from 38.6% 12 months before death to 34.7% during the final month before death (P < .001 for trend). Among older adults with dementia who used at least 1 medication of questionable benefit 12 months before death, 74.8% remained exposed until their last month of life. Living in an institution was independently associated with a 15% reduction of the likelihood to receive >= 1 medication of questionable benefit during the last month before death (odds ratio 0.85, 95% confidence interval 0.88-0.83). Antidementia drugs accounted for one-fifth of the total number of medications of questionable benefit. Lipid-lowering agents were used by 8.3% of individuals during their final month of life (10.2% of community-dwellers and 6.6% of institutionalized people, P < .001). Conclusion: Clinicians caring for older adults with advanced dementia should be provided with reliable tools to help them reduce the burden of medications of questionable benefit near the end of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 18, no 6, 551.e1-551.e7 p.
Keyword [en]
Dementia, end of life, drug therapy, palliative care
National Category
Geriatrics Gerontology, specializing in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-144692DOI: 10.1016/j.jamda.2017.02.021ISI: 000402431200021OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-144692DiVA: diva2:1128066
Available from: 2017-07-21 Created: 2017-07-21 Last updated: 2017-07-21Bibliographically approved

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