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International business negotiations in Brazil
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
Number of Authors: 3
2017 (English)In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 32, no 4, 591-605 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose - The purpose of this study was to explore an innovative strategy for studying the Brazilian negotiator's unique and paradoxical characteristics from a cultural point of view to acquire a better understanding of the nature of international business negotiations in Brazil. Design/methodology/approach - The study is of a qualitative nature, using a multiple-case study design at three levels (small-, medium-and large-scale negotiations). Interviews were conducted with Brazilian and German managers to capture the emic-etic view of the Brazilian negotiator. The Strategic Trinity Model was developed to assess the behavior of the Brazilian negotiator in agreement with three metaphors: African Capoeirista, Portuguese Bureaucrat and Indigenous Warrior. Findings - The three roles African Capoeirista, Portuguese Bureaucrat and Indigenous Warrior comprised similar as well as contradicting characteristics. The Brazilian negotiator chose naturally and even paradoxically from these role features, effectively negotiating any given situation, context and time. During the pre-and post-negotiation phases, traits of the African Capoeirista and Indigenous Warrior were the most salient. During the formal negotiation phase, however, the characteristics of the African Capoeirista and Portuguese Bureaucrat dominated. Research limitations/implications - International business negotiations in Brazil call for an in-depth comprehension of the paradoxical roles that local negotiators take on to achieve better negotiation outcomes. Originality/value - The present study unveiled the contradicting Brazilian negotiating style in international business negotiations, thus acquiring a better understanding of the negotiation process in the Brazilian market.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 32, no 4, 591-605 p.
Keyword [en]
Culture, Brazil, International business negotiations
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-145285DOI: 10.1108/JBIM-11-2016-0257ISI: 000404812500013OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-145285DiVA: diva2:1128404
Available from: 2017-07-25 Created: 2017-07-25 Last updated: 2017-07-25Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf