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Cognitive and Physical Function in Relation to the Risk of Injurious Falls in Older Adults: A Population-Based Study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
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Number of Authors: 5
2017 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 72, no 5, 669-675 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: We aimed to quantify the independent effect of cognitive and physical deficits on the risk of injurious falls, to verify whether this risk is modified by global cognitive impairment, and to explore whether risk varies by follow-up time. Methods: Data on 2,495 participants (>= 60 years) from the population-based Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen (SNAC-K) study were analyzed using flexible parametric survival models. Two cognitive domains (processing speed and executive function) were assessed with standard tests. Physical function tests included balance (one-leg-stands), walking speed, chair stands, and grip strength. Global cognition was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination. Results: A total of 167 people experienced an injurious fall over 3 years of follow-up, 310 over 5 years, and 571 over 10 years. Each standard deviation worse balance, slower walking speed, and longer chair stand time increased the risk of injurious falls over 3 years by 43%, 38%, and 23%, respectively (p<.05). Each standard deviation worse processing speed and executive function was significantly associated with 10% increased risk of injurious falls over 10 years (p<.05). In stratified analyses, deficits in physical functioning were associated with injurious falls only in people with cognitive impairment, whereas deficits in processing speed and executive function were associated with injurious falls only in people without cognitive impairment. Conclusions: Deficits in specific cognitive domains, such as processing speed and executive function, appear to predict injurious falls in the long term. Deficits in physical function predict falls in the short term, especially in people with global cognitive impairment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 72, no 5, 669-675 p.
Keyword [en]
Physical function, Processing speed, Executive function, Falls, Swedish National study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen (SNAC-K)
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-145265DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glw141ISI: 000404518000011PubMedID: 27449140OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-145265DiVA: diva2:1128530
Available from: 2017-07-26 Created: 2017-07-26 Last updated: 2017-07-26Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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