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The Impact of Steroidal Glycoalkaloids on the Physiology of Phytophthora infestans, the Causative Agent of Potato Late Blight
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden.
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Number of Authors: 5
2017 (English)In: Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, ISSN 0894-0282, E-ISSN 1943-7706, Vol. 30, no 7, 531-542 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) are plant secondary metabolites known to be toxic to animals and humans and that have putative roles in defense against pests. The proposed mechanisms of SGA toxicity are sterol-mediated disruption of membranes and inhibition of cholinesterase activity in neurons. It has been suggested that phytopathogenic microorganisms can overcome SGA toxicity by enzymatic deglycosylation of SGAs. Here, we have explored SGA-mediated toxicity toward the invasive oomycete Phytophthora infestans, the causative agent of the late blight disease in potato and tomato, as well as the potential for SGA deglycosylation by this species. Our growth studies indicate that solanidine, the nonglycosylated precursor of the potato SGAs a-chaconine and a-solanine, has a greater physiological impact than its glycosylated forms. All of these compounds were incorporated into the mycelium, but only solanidine could strongly inhibit the growth of P. infestans in liquid culture. Genes encoding several glycoside hydrolases with potential activity on SGAs were identified in the genome of P. infestans and were shown to be expressed. However, we found no indication that deglycosylation of SGAs takes place. We present additional evidence for apparent host-specific adaptation to potato SGAs and assess all results in terms of future pathogen management strategies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 30, no 7, 531-542 p.
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Biological Sciences Environmental Biotechnology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-145356DOI: 10.1094/MPMI-09-16-0186-RISI: 000404048400002PubMedID: 28510502OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-145356DiVA: diva2:1128587
Available from: 2017-07-26 Created: 2017-07-26 Last updated: 2017-07-26Bibliographically approved

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