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Receiving early information and trusting Swedish child health centre nurses increased parents' willingness to vaccinate against rotavirus infections
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Sachs′ Children and Youth Hospital, Sweden.
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Number of Authors: 7
2017 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 8, 1309-1316 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: Rotavirus vaccines are effective against severe infections, but have a modest impact on mortality in high-income countries. Parental knowledge and attitudes towards vaccines are crucial for high vaccination coverage. This study aimed to identify why parents refused to let their infant have the vaccination or were unsure. Methods: This cross-sectional study was based on 1,063 questionnaires completed by the parents of newborn children in 2014. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify the main predictors. Results: Most (81%) parents intended to vaccinate their child against the rotavirus, while 19% were unwilling or uncertain. Parents with less education and children up to five weeks of age were more likely to be unwilling or uncertain about vaccinating their child. Factors associated with a refusal or uncertainty about vaccinating were not having enough information about the vaccine, no intention of accepting other vaccines, paying little heed to the child health nurses' recommendations, thinking that the rotavirus was not a serious illness and not believing that the vaccine provided protection against serious forms of gastroenteritis. Conclusion: Early information, extra information for parents with less education and close positive relationships between parents and child health nurses were important factors in high rotavirus vaccination rates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 106, no 8, 1309-1316 p.
Keyword [en]
Child health services, Health knowledge, Nurses, Rotavirus, Vaccination
National Category
Pediatrics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-145869DOI: 10.1111/apa.13872ISI: 000405233800016PubMedID: 28419538OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-145869DiVA: diva2:1135389
Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2017-08-23Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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  • de-DE
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