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Intrinsic brain connectivity after partial sleep deprivation in young and older adults: results from the Stockholm Sleepy Brain study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
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2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, 9422Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sleep deprivation has been reported to affect intrinsic brain connectivity, notably reducing connectivity in the default mode network. Studies to date have however shown inconsistent effects, in many cases lacked monitoring of wakefulness, and largely included young participants. We investigated effects of sleep deprivation on intrinsic brain connectivity in young and older participants. Participants aged 20–30 (final n = 30) and 65–75 (final n = 23) years underwent partial sleep deprivation (3 h sleep) in a cross-over design, with two 8-minutes eyes-open resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) runs in each session, monitored by eye-tracking. We assessed intrinsic brain connectivity using independent components analysis (ICA) as well as seed-region analyses of functional connectivity, and also analysed global signal variability, regional homogeneity, and the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations. Sleep deprivation caused increased global signal variability. Changes in investigated resting state networks and in regional homogeneity were not statistically significant. Younger participants had higher connectivity in most examined networks, as well as higher regional homogeneity in areas including anterior and posterior cingulate cortex. In conclusion, we found that sleep deprivation caused increased global signal variability, and we speculate that this may be caused by wake-state instability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 7, 9422
Keyword [en]
sleep deprivation, neurology
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-146241DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-09744-7ISI: 000408448100015OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-146241DiVA: diva2:1136419
Note

This work was supported by Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, Fredrik and Ingrid Thuring’s Foundation, and the Karolinska Institutet Strategic Neuroscience Program.

Available from: 2017-08-28 Created: 2017-08-28 Last updated: 2017-09-18Bibliographically approved

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