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From road distraction to safe driving: Evaluating the effects of boredom and gamification on driving behaviour, physiological arousal, and subjective experience
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
Number of Authors: 3
2017 (English)In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 75, 714-726 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Boredom and low levels of task engagement while driving can pose road safety risks, e.g., inattention during low traffic, routine trips, or semi-automated driving. Digital technology interventions that increase task engagement, e.g., through performance feedback, increased challenge, and incentives (often referred to as `gamification'), could therefore offer safety benefits. To explore the impact of such interventions, we conducted experiments in a high-fidelity driving simulator with thirty-two participants. In two counterbalanced conditions (control and intervention), we compared driving behaviour, physiological arousal, and subjective experience. Results indicate that the gamified boredom intervention reduced unsafe coping mechanisms such as speeding while promoting anticipatory driving. We can further infer that the intervention not only increased one's attention and arousal during the intermittent gamification challenges, but that these intermittent stimuli may also help sustain one's attention and arousal in between challenges and throughout a drive. At the same time, the gamified condition led to slower hazard reactions and short off-road glances. Our contributions deepen our understanding of driver boredom and pave the way for engaging interventions for safety critical tasks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 75, 714-726 p.
Keyword [en]
Automotive user interfaces, Boredom, Distraction, Driving simulator study, Electrocardiography (ECG), Electrodermal activity (EDA), Gamification, Human-computer interaction, Mobile interactions, Psychophysiology, Road safety, Smartphone use, Task engagement, Technology augmented driving
National Category
Psychology Computer and Information Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-146955DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2017.06.019ISI: 000407186500069OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-146955DiVA: diva2:1142443
Available from: 2017-09-19 Created: 2017-09-19 Last updated: 2017-09-19Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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  • Other style
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  • de-DE
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NB
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