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Understanding ecosystem service bundles and their social-ecological patterns in a Swedish landscape
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3626-967X
2017 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Managing landscapes in a way that ensures sustainable development and the continued production of benefits to a diverse set of people requires an understanding how people use, modify, and depend on their local environment. This thesis uses the concept of ecosystem service bundles to articulate the social-ecological dynamics that define landscapes. In particular, this thesis focuses on how social and ecological factors create patterns of ecosystem service bundles and how well we can predict these patterns. It also explores ecosystem service bundles as a concept and how it can be better operationalized.

In the first paper, I explore how well different theories of human-nature interaction predict the distribution of ecosystem services in the Norrström drainage basin in Sweden. Traditionally, land use is the accepted driver of ecosystem service production. However, by including social, economic and geographic variables, I show that this broader social-ecological set of drivers are better at predicting the presence of ecosystem services and their configurations in the landscape. This paper bridges empirically based ecosystem service mapping with theory driven modeling and highlights a need for the development of a coherent social-ecological theory of human-nature interaction.

In the second paper, I investigate different conceptualizations of ecosystem service bundles. The paper highlights three key areas of focus uniquely important for assessing ecosystem service bundles and comparing them across cases – namely 1) scale – extent and units of observation 2) chain of production, and 3) mechanisms and drivers. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University , 2017. , p. 25
Keywords [en]
Ecosystem service, bundles, drivers, landscape, patterns, Sweden, Norrström, Mälaren, Mälardalen, social-ecological, human-nature
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-147296OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-147296DiVA, id: diva2:1143390
Presentation
2017-10-12, 312, Kräftriket 2B, Stockholm, 12:25 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2012-1058Available from: 2018-03-06 Created: 2017-09-21 Last updated: 2018-03-06Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Social-ecological drivers of multiple ecosystem services: what variables explain patterns of ecosystem services across the Norrstrom drainage basin?
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social-ecological drivers of multiple ecosystem services: what variables explain patterns of ecosystem services across the Norrstrom drainage basin?
2016 (English)In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In human dominated landscapes many diverse, and often antagonistic, human activities are intentionally and inadvertently determining the supply of various ecosystem services. Understanding how different social and ecological factors shape the availability of ecosystem services is essential for fair and effective policy and management. In this paper, we evaluate how well alternative social-ecological models of human impact on ecosystems explain patterns of 16 ecosystem services (ES) across the 62 municipalities of the Norrstrom drainage basin in Sweden. We test four models of human impact on ecosystems, land use, ecological modernization, ecological footprint, and location theory, and test their ability to predict both individual ES and bundles of ES. We find that different models do best to predict different types of individual ES. Land use is the best model for predicting provisioning services, standing water quality, biodiversity appreciation, and cross-country skiing, while other models work better for the remaining services. However, this range of models is not able to predict some of the cultural ES. ES bundles are predicted worse than individual ES by these models, but provide a clear picture of variation in multiple ecosystem services based on limited information. Based on our results, we offer suggestions on how social-ecological modeling and assessments of ecosystems can be further developed.

Keywords
ecological footprint, ecological modernization, ecosystem service bundles, land use change, location theory, Stockholm, Sweden
National Category
Biological Sciences Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-130012 (URN)10.5751/ES-08077-210114 (DOI)000373935100012 ()
Available from: 2016-05-11 Created: 2016-05-09 Last updated: 2018-01-24Bibliographically approved

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