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Prey selection of the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus (Miers, 1876)(Brachyura: Portunidae) foraging on bivalves
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Functional Morphology.
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Crustacean Biology, ISSN 0278-0372, E-ISSN 1937-240X, Vol. 37, no 5, 521-528 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Predators may be exposed to different prey types simultaneously, and so may select certainprey types over others. We examined prey selection, predation rate, and foraging behaviourof the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus (Miers, 1876) provided with three types of clams, the Manila Ruditapes philippinarum (Adams & Reeve, 1850), bloody Scapharca subcrenata (Lischke,1896), and hard Meretrix meretrix (Linnaeus, 1758) clams in laboratory experiments. When provided will all three possible prey simultaneously, crabs exhibited higher preference for R. philippinarum over S. subcrenata and M. meretrix (Chesson’s selectivity index; P = 0.003). In the single-prey experiments, predation rates were signifcantly higher on R. philippinarum and S. subcrenata than on M. meretrix (P = 0.002). Video analysis revealed that prey type signifcantly affected both the proportion of time crabs spent on searching, and the probability of consumption upon capture. The proportion of time crabs spent on handling (P = 0.171), the encounter rate (P = 0.918), and the probability of capture upon encounter (P = 0.456), however, were not signifcantly affected by prey types. Handling time per prey was not signifcantly different among clam species. For the crab, prey proftability (energy intake perunit handling time) of R. philippinarum was similar to that of S. subcrenata, in both cases being signifcantly higher than that of M. meretrix (P ﹤ 0.001). The relative frequencies of changing from searching to handling were significantly higher for M. meretrix than for R. philippinarum and S. subcrenata (P = 0.007). These results suggest that the probability of consumption upon capture explained the observed selection by crabs. Furthermore, prey proftability, shell strength, and shell width, are important elements to affect prey selection of the crab.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 37, no 5, 521-528 p.
Keyword [en]
active selection, foraging behaviour, passive selection, predation rate, selection index
National Category
Zoology
Research subject
Zoology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-147367DOI: 10.1093/jcbiol/rux071OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-147367DiVA: diva2:1144134
Available from: 2017-09-25 Created: 2017-09-25 Last updated: 2017-09-26Bibliographically approved

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