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Self-esteem in children in joint physical custody and other living arrangements
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Karlstad University, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
Number of Authors: 3
2017 (English)In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 149, 106-112 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Parental support has been shown to be important for children's self-esteem, which in turn is related to later important life outcomes. Today, an increasing number of children in the Western world spend time in both the parents' respective households after a separation. Children who live with both parents report more parental support than children who live only with one parent after a divorce. We took the opportunity of the commonness of children sharing their time between their parents' homes in Sweden to investigate children's self-esteem in relation to family type. Study design and methods: With nationally representative survey data (ULF) collected from both parents and children, we analyze differences in children's self-esteem among 4823 10-18 year olds in nuclear families, joint physical custody and those living mostly or only with one parent after a separation using ordinary least squares regression, adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Results: We found no significant difference in self-esteem between children who lived equally much with both parents, mostly with one parent and those in nuclear families, whereas children in single care showed lower self-esteem compared with children in the other living arrangements. The difference was not explained by socioeconomic factors. Conclusion: The self-esteem of children who share their time between their parent's respective homes after a separation does not deviate from that in their peers in nuclear families. Instead, those in single care reported lower self-esteem than those in the other living arrangements. These differences were not explained by socioeconomic factors. Longitudinal studies are needed to establish pre- and post-separation family characteristics that influence self-esteem and well-being in young people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 149, 106-112 p.
Keyword [en]
Joint physical custody, Self-esteem, Adolescent, Divorce, Parental separation
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-147128DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2017.04.009ISI: 000407538900018PubMedID: 28595062OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-147128DiVA: diva2:1145825
Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2017-09-29Bibliographically approved

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