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Working in the Same Sector, in the Same Organization and in the Same Occupation: Women and Men Physicians’ Work Climate and Health Complaints
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This study explores similarities and differences between women and men with similar working conditions (working within the same sector, in the same organization, and in the same occupation). Women and men were compared regarding 1) levels of psychological work climate and health complaints and 2) how the work climate related to health complaints.

Design/Methodology: Questionnaire data were collected from 95 women and 105 men physicians who worked in the same acute care hospital in Sweden in 2001.

Results: Results showed no gender differences in the job, role, leadership, or organizational characteristics. Women reported less workgroup cohesiveness and cooperation and more mental and physical health complaints than men. Role characteristics (overload/conflict/ambiguity) were related to more health complaints for both women and men. Workgroup cohesiveness and cooperation were related to less health complaints only for men.

Limitations: The study did not account for women and men often working as physicians in different specialties and/or may perform different work tasks. The non-work domain was not investigated.

Research/practical implications: This study indicates similarities between women and men when the work situation is similar, but suggests that some of the differences that appear in the larger structures of the gender-segregated labor market also seem to be present for women and men who work in the same sector, the same organization, and in the same occupation.

Originality: Previous research has underscored the problem of finding samples that are large enough to allow comparing women and men working under similar working conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Fr-SYM-1615-4
Keyword [en]
health care, physicians, work environment, subjective health complaints
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-147510OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-147510DiVA: diva2:1146142
Conference
European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology, Dublin, Ireland, May 17-20, 2017.
Note

This research formed part of  Stockholm Stress Center, a center for excellence supported by FORTE.

Available from: 2017-10-02 Created: 2017-10-02 Last updated: 2017-10-02

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Falkenberg, HelenaNäswall, KatharinaLindfors, PetraSverke, Magnus
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