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Becoming extreme: A media analysis of how music is constructed in three marginalised/outsider groups’ fanzines
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4767-7663
2017 (English)In: Abstracts NNMPF 2017, 2017, 12-13 p.Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Music and and art is often considered to help good people. On the internet and in newspapers we can find lots of debates and articles about how the world would be a better place if only the arts played a more prominent role in education. In this paper we will investigate the other side of the coin. Considering that Mussolini was an accomplished violinist, Hitler and Franco both were talented painters and Mao a recognized poet. We will not assume that art leads to what the society, in general, consider as good or decent, but rather ask what role music plays in constructions of subgroups who are, by choice or by exclusion, outsiders in society. In recent years in the afterglow of the economic regression and often connected to the increased migration, more extreme groups and politicians have gained ground. We have decided to study musical socialisation in three marginalised groups who could loosely be labelled: “the Salvation Christian Movement”, “the Black Metal Movement” and “the New/Alt Right movement”. These – in every respect highly idealistic – groups have been selected to represent different angles to understand how music, ideology/religion and society intersect. The three groups also share a scepticism towards representative democracy in various forms. The groups are however different in that some seek power and influence while others seek to be more exclusive. Also the kind of ideology or belief that is at the roots of the movements are very different, as are the level of “danger” associated with the groups. The empirical material for the paper is what we label “fanzines” online and offline since 2014 that Swedish youth are likely to read. A fanzine in this meaning could be a group on social media, a physical paper, an online forum, webpage or a podcast.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. 12-13 p.
Keyword [en]
Black metal, New/Alt-Right, Salvation Christian, Music Education
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Music Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-147753OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-147753DiVA: diva2:1148633
Conference
The 22nd Annual Conference of the Nordic Network for Research in Music Education, Gothenburg, Sweden, March 14-16, 2017
Available from: 2017-10-11 Created: 2017-10-11 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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