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Does job promotion affect men's and women's health differently? Dynamic panel models with fixed effects
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8806-5698
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
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Number of Authors: 52017 (English)In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 1137-1146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Higher occupational status has consistently been shown to be associated with better health, but few studies have to date examined if an upward change in occupational status is associated with a positive change in health. Furthermore, very little is known about whether this association differs by sex. Methods: Data were derived from four waves (2008-14) of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH), a follow-up study of a nationally representative sample of the Swedish working population. The present study comprises 1410 men and 1926 women. A dynamic panel model with fixed effects was used to analyse the lagged association between job promotion on the one hand and self-rated health (SRH) and symptoms of depression on the other. This method allowed controlling for unobserved time-invariant confounders and determining the direction of causality between the variables. Multigroup comparisons were performed to investigate differences between the sexes. Results: The results showed that job promotion was associated with decreased subsequent SRH and increased symptoms of depression among both men and women. Women reported a larger relative worsening of self-rated health following a job promotion than men and men reported a larger relative worsening of depression symptoms. There was limited evidence that SRH and symptoms of depression were associated with subsequent job promotion. Conclusions: The present study indicates that a job promotion could lead to decreased SRH and increased symptoms of depression in a 2-4-year perspective. Associations appear to differ for women and men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2017. Vol. 46, no 4, p. 1137-1146
Keywords [en]
job promotion, self-rated health, symptoms of depression, gender, dynamic panel model, fixed effects
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-147907DOI: 10.1093/ije/dyw310ISI: 000411078800017PubMedID: 28040745OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-147907DiVA, id: diva2:1150283
Note

This work was supported by: the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare [2013-1253]; the Swedish Council for Working Life [2005-0734 and 2009-1077]; the Swedish Research Council [2009-6192, 825-2013-1645, and 821-2013-1646]; and the Stockholm Stress Centre, an FAS Centre of Excellence [2009-1758]. The funding sources were involved in neither the conduct of the research nor the preparation of the article.

Available from: 2017-10-18 Created: 2017-10-18 Last updated: 2018-01-18Bibliographically approved

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Nyberg, AnnaPeristera, ParaskeviWesterlund, HugoJohansson, GunnMagnusson Hanson, Linda L.
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