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Complex genetic diversity patterns of cryptic, sympatric brown trout (Salmo trutta) populations in tiny mountain lakes
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Institute of Marine Research, Norway.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
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Number of Authors: 8
2017 (English)In: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 18, no 5, 1213-1227 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Intraspecific genetic variation can have similar effects as species diversity on ecosystem function; understanding such variation is important, particularly for ecological key species. The brown trout plays central roles in many northern freshwater ecosystems, and several cases of sympatric brown trout populations have been detected in freshwater lakes based on apparent morphological differences. In some rare cases, sympatric, genetically distinct populations lacking visible phenotypic differences have been detected based on genetic data alone. Detecting such cryptic sympatric populations without prior grouping of individuals based on phenotypic characteristics is more difficult statistically, though. The aim of the present study is to delineate the spatial connectivity of two cryptic, sympatric genetic clusters of brown trout discovered in two interconnected, tiny subarctic Swedish lakes. The structures were detected using allozyme markers, and have been monitored over time. Here, we confirm their existence for almost three decades and report that these cryptic, sympatric populations exhibit very different connectivity patterns to brown trout of nearby lakes. One of the clusters is relatively isolated while the other one shows high genetic similarity to downstream populations. There are indications of different spawning sites as reflected in genetic structuring among parr from different creeks. We used > 3000 SNPs on a subsample and find that the SNPs largely confirm the allozyme pattern but give considerably lower F (ST) values, and potentially indicate further structuring within populations. This type of complex genetic substructuring over microgeographical scales might be more common than anticipated and needs to be considered in conservation management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 18, no 5, 1213-1227 p.
Keyword [en]
Population structure, Genetic biodiversity, SNP, Allozyme, Biocomplexity
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-147861DOI: 10.1007/s10592-017-0972-4ISI: 000411219800019OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-147861DiVA: diva2:1153087
Available from: 2017-10-27 Created: 2017-10-27 Last updated: 2017-10-27Bibliographically approved

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Andersson, AnastasiaJansson, EevaWennerström, LovisaRyman, NilsLaikre, Linda
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