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Who Becomes a Politician?
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
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2017 (English)In: Quarterly Journal of Economics, ISSN 0033-5533, E-ISSN 1531-4650, Vol. 132, no 4, 1877-1914 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Can a democracy attract competent leaders, while attaining broad representation? Economic models suggest that free-riding incentives and lower opportunity costs give the less competent a comparative advantage at entering political life. Moreover, if elites have more human capital, selecting on competence may lead to uneven representation. This article examines patterns of political selection among the universe of municipal politicians and national legislators in Sweden, using extraordinarily rich data on competence traits and social background for the entire population. We document four new facts that together characterize an “inclusive meritocracy.” First, politicians are on average significantly smarter and better leaders than the population they represent. Second, this positive selection is present even when conditioning on family (and hence social) background, suggesting that individual competence is key for selection. Third, the representation of social background, whether measured by parental earnings or occupational social class, is remarkably even. Fourth, there is at best a weak trade-off in selection between competence and social representation, mainly due to strong positive selection of politicians of low (parental) socioeconomic status. A broad implication of these facts is that it is possible for democracy to generate competent and socially representative leadership. JEL Codes: H1, H70, J45, P16.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 132, no 4, 1877-1914 p.
National Category
Economics
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URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-149157DOI: 10.1093/qje/qjx016OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-149157DiVA: diva2:1158319
Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2017-11-20 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved

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Persson, TorstenRickne, Johanna
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