Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Therapist-led and at-home one-session Virtual Reality exposure therapy for public speaking anxiety using consumer hardware and software, with online maintenance: A randomized controlled trial
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
Show others and affiliations
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Exposure therapy is an effective treatment of public speaking anxiety (PSA), yet inherent logistic challenges prevent widespread dissemination. Previous research has revealed that Virtual Reality (VR) may be effectively used for realistic stimuli presentation, but past generations of VR hardware have been inaccessible and expensive. We reasoned that VR stimuli, delivered using modern consumer hardware and software, would enable one-session treatment of PSA, both in the form of traditional therapist-led treatment and as an internet intervention.

Methods: N=50 adult participants from the general public with clinically significant PSA were recruited and randomized to either therapist-led one-session treatment followed by online maintenance promoting in-vivo exposure, or waiting-list. The three-hour exposure session included psychoeducation and had participants conducting speech exercises, framed as behavioral experiments targeting idiosyncratic catastrophic beliefs, in front of virtual audiences, and listening to audio recording afterwards. Primary outcome measure was selfreported PSA, assessed using a validated instrument, measured before and after the treatment session, weekly during the four-week maintenance period, and at the end. After the first phase of the study, the waiting-list group received a simple VR headset by post and were given access to an online version of the same treatment (including the maintenance program), conducted their own one-session treatment followed by the same maintenance program, and reported PSA using the same intervals as before. Data were analyzed using mixed effects modeling.

Results: A significant time*group effect was found such that the treatment group reported a 6.92-point larger decrease in PSA symptoms per treatment step than the waiting-list, corresponding to a between-group d=0.84 after the one-session treatment, growing to d=1.56 after the maintenance period. Piece-wise modeling of the waiting-list group’s PSA scores before and after they received their at-home equivalent treatment revealed a 6.39-point difference in decrease (per step) after receiving treatment compared to before, corresponding to a within-group d=1.22 after the at-home one-session treatment, growing to d=1.78 after the maintenance period.

Conclusions: This trial demonstrates that simple, consumer VR hardware and software can be used to treat PSA using a one-session format, with large effect sizes. To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the potential of internet-administered, at-home VR treatment, the results of which are promising.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. p. 19-20
Keywords [en]
PSA, public speaking anxiety, VR, virtual reality, one-session treatment
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-149194OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-149194DiVA, id: diva2:1158625
Conference
9th Swedish Congress on internet interventions (SWEsrii), Linköping, Sweden, November 3, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2017-11-20 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lindner, PhilipMiloff, AlexanderCarlbring, Per
By organisation
Clinical psychology
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 1066 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf