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Using student-generated questions and peer-responses as a formative e-assessment strategy: Students acting as more knowledgeable others
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. University of Rwanda, Rwanda.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education / [ed] Jon Dron, Sanjaya Mishra, Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 2017, 108-117 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Student-generated questions and peer-responses can support formative assessment practices through student self-questioning and peer scaffolding. So far, the studies on student-generated questions and peer-responses have focused on reading comprehension. This study focused on student-generated questions used in the context of the student-based formative e-assessment through peer scaffolding. This study's aim was two-fold: Firstly, we wanted to examine whether there was a relationship between the thinking levels exhibited in student-generated questions and the thinking levels exhibited in their corresponding peer-responses. Secondly, we wanted to analyse the level of students’ satisfaction with their peers’ responses. Using a Bloom’s Taxonomy-based assessment rubric, the student generated-questions and peer-responses were rated following three thinking levels: basic, medium, and high. The results show that the thinking levels exhibited in the student-generated questions are not the same as the thinking levels exhibited in their corresponding peer-responses. In addition, all students were not immediately satisfied with their peer-responses. In the end, we realised that through this exercise, the student-questioners and the student-respondents were respectively engaged in a “meaning-seeking” and “meaning-making” exercise and the longer the time for reaching the consensus, the more this exercise grew stronger and became much more significant.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 2017. 108-117 p.
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
Information Society
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-149277ISBN: 978-1-939797-31-5 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-149277DiVA: diva2:1159993
Conference
E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, Oct 17, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-24 Created: 2017-11-24 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved

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Bahati, BernardFors, UnoHansen, Preben
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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