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The spatial organization of bone craft during the Middle and Late Mesolithic: Patterns of bone tool production at Ringsjöholm and Strandvägen in Sweden
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper focuses on the spatial distribution of osseous tool production debitage from two Mesolithic sites in Sweden, Ringsjöholm and Strandvägen, with well-preserved faunal remains including high numbers of osseous artifacts. Local production of osseous tools on both sites has generated a variety of identifiable unfinished products and debitage deriving from complete chains of production, including unmodified bones, various kinds of debitage and finished products. Identified categories include: anatomical and technical blanks, removed epiphyses, bone flakes and preforms. Identification of species and element distributions show that antler and metapodial bone from red deer was the preferred raw material. Technological characteristics of the osseous craft and different stages of production have been identified. Spatial statistical analyses confirm that different stages of osseous tool production were organized within separate areas of the sites and that larger items were discarded in the water along the shorelines adjacent to the settlements. Interestingly, blanks and preforms seem to have been stored under water for future use. At Strandvägen demarcated clusters of bone flakes in association with dwellings represent craft areas, or "bone knapping floors" where production was more intense than in other areas.

Keywords [en]
Bone craft, Bone tool production, Spatial distribution, Mesolithic
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-149453OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-149453DiVA, id: diva2:1161704
Available from: 2017-11-30 Created: 2017-11-30 Last updated: 2018-01-08Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Points on Production: Taphonomic research on Mesolithic osseous assemblages in Sweden
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Points on Production: Taphonomic research on Mesolithic osseous assemblages in Sweden
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Osteoarchaeological materials are influenced by many consecutive factors, from human hunting strategies, consumption patterns and waste disposal to mechanical and chemical changes in bone structure and shape. Here Mesolithic osteoarchaeological patterns have been examined in relation to the production of bone and antler artefacts. The osseous production in Sweden of the period c. 7000–4500 cal BC shows both similarities and differences between six investigated sites, representing two different geographical regions. These may be seen in both manufacturing techniques and raw material use and may be linked to different traditions, but also to different utilization of different taskscapes. The production is also linked to lithic craft and the theme of e.g. raw material acquisition is also relevant in relation to the production of osseous artefacts. Spatial studies clearly show how different taphonomic processes affect the accumulation of bone material on site, but also how practitioners’ choices associated with the osseous craft affect these patterns. On several of the investigated sites, deposits of raw material have been found in the waters outside the settlements. In the settlement debitage from the production and forming of the artefacts, bone knapping floors have been identified. These are located centrally, in relation to other archaeological structures such as lithic knapping floors and dwellings. The osteoarchaeological record is biased in part due to debitage from osseous production but also from active human selection, transport and deposition of raw materials. These activities and the human choices of production affect the patterns, and through careful taphonomic analyses various accumulative processes may be highlighted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University, 2018. p. 133
Series
Theses and papers in osteoarchaeology, ISSN 1652-4098 ; 09
Keywords
Osteoarchaeological patterns, Taphonomic analysis, Osseous craft, Mesolithic, Spatial studies
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-149658 (URN)978-91-7797-114-6 (ISBN)978-91-7797-115-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-02-23, De Geersalen, Geovetenskapens hus, Svante Arrhenius väg 14, Stockholm, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 2: Manuscript. Paper 4: Manuscript.

Available from: 2018-01-31 Created: 2017-12-07 Last updated: 2018-01-31Bibliographically approved

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