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Points of Bone and Antler from the Late Mesolithic settlement in Motala, eastern central Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
2018 (English)In: Working at the sharp end:from bone and antler to Early Mesolithic life in Northern Europe. / [ed] Groß, D., Lübke, H., Meadows, J. & Jantzen, D., 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Excavations at Motala, eastern central Sweden, have yielded a large and diverse material of osseous tools dating from the Late Mesolithic, c. 6000-4500 cal BC. The assembled collection comprises some 1500 pieces. About half of the identified tool types consist of different types of bone points of which barbed points dominate. The utilized raw material was predominantly red deer (Cervus elaphus) metatarsals and antler but other element do occur, as do bones from moose (Alces alces) and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus). More than 450 fragments of barbed points have been identified and interpreted as leister points or harpoon heads. The morphology of the barbed points were classified according to the general appearance of the corpus of points (setting of barbs) but more specifically from the morphology of basal ends. Aside from harpoons eight different groups of leister points were defined. The leister points are interpreted as prongs or single hafted points for fish-spears. Plain bone points are the second largest group, and may be sorted into several types, primarily interpreted as projectiles like arrowheads. Small bullet-like arrowheads and some rhombic points as well as club-shaped points of antler are also present. Slotted points appear in two different types either with uni- or bilateral edges. Based on the collection from the site Strandvägen and with help of morphological groups as well as a large number of radiocarbon dates, we have identified a change in the utilization of fishing implements at c. 5000 cal BC. The change is detected as a discontinuation in the use of barbed leister points and a possible shift from bilateral to unilateral slotted points in addition to overall decreasing human activities, despite a continued presence at the site.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018.
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Osteoarchaeology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-149447OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-149447DiVA: diva2:1161709
Conference
Working at the sharp end at Hohen Viecheln: From bone and antler to Early Mesolithic Life in Northern Europe, March 14-16, 2016
Note

Unpublished. Reproduced with permission of the editors

Available from: 2017-11-30 Created: 2017-11-30 Last updated: 2017-12-14
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