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New insights on cultural dualism and population structure in the Middle Neolithic Funnel Beaker culture on the island of Gotland
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 17, p. 325-334Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years it has been shown that the Neolithization of Europe was partly driven by migration of farming groups admixing with local hunter-gatherer groups as they dispersed across the continent. However, little research has been done on the cultural duality of contemporaneous foragers and farming populations in the same region. Here we investigate the demographic history of the Funnel Beaker culture [Trichterbecherkultur or TRB, c. 4000–2800 cal BCE], and the sub-Neolithic Pitted Ware culture complex [PWC, c. 3300–2300 cal BCE] during the Nordic Middle Neolithic period on the island of Gotland, Sweden. We use a multidisciplinary approach to investigate individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen, the only confirmed TRB burial on the island. We present new radiocarbon dating, isotopic analyses for diet and mobility, and mitochondrial DNA haplogroup data to infer maternal inheritance. We also present a new Sr-baseline of 0.71208 ± 0.0016 for the local isotope variation. We compare and discuss our findings together with that of contemporaneous populations in Sweden and the North European mainland.

The radiocarbon dating and Strontium isotopic ratios show that the dolmen was used between c. 3300–2700 cal BCE by a population which displayed local Sr-signals. Mitochondrial data show that the individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen had maternal genetic affinity to that of other Early and Middle Neolithic farming cultures in Europe, distinct from that of the contemporaneous PWC on the island. Furthermore, they exhibited a strict terrestrial and/or slightly varied diet in contrast to the strict marine diet of the PWC. The findings indicate that two different contemporary groups coexisted on the same island for several hundred years with separate cultural identity, lifestyles, as well as dietary patterns.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 17, p. 325-334
Keywords [en]
TRB, Dolmen, PWC, Strontium, carbon and nitrogen isotopes, aDNA, mtDNA, Radiocarbon dating
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-149619DOI: 10.1016/j.jasrep.2017.09.002ISI: 000429561000031OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-149619DiVA, id: diva2:1163404
Projects
Atlas över förhistoriska människors genom i Sverige
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-1905Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M13-0904:1Available from: 2017-12-06 Created: 2017-12-06 Last updated: 2018-04-30Bibliographically approved

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Storå, JanGötherström, Anders
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