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Plant functional connectivity - integrating landscape structure and effective dispersal
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. University of York, UK.
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Number of Authors: 10
2017 (English)In: Journal of Ecology, ISSN 0022-0477, E-ISSN 1365-2745, Vol. 105, no 6, 1648-1656 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

1. Dispersal is essential for species to survive the threats of habitat destruction and climate change. Combining descriptions of dispersal ability with those of landscape structure, the concept of functional connectivity has been popular for understanding and predicting species' spatial responses to environmental change. 2. Following recent advances, the functional connectivity concept is now able to move beyond landscape structure to consider more explicitly how other external factors such as climate and resources affect species movement. We argue that these factors, in addition to a consideration of the complete dispersal process, are critical for an accurate understanding of functional connectivity for plant species in response to environmental change. 3. We use recent advances in dispersal, landscape and molecular ecology to describe how a range of external factors can influence effective dispersal in plant species, and how the resulting functional connectivity can be assessed. 4. Synthesis. We define plant functional connectivity as the effective dispersal of propagules or pollen among habitat patches in a landscape. Plant functional connectivity is determined by a combination of landscape structure, interactions between plant, environment and dispersal vectors, and the successful establishment of individuals. We hope that this consolidation of recent research will help focus future connectivity research and conservation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 105, no 6, 1648-1656 p.
Keyword [en]
biodiversity conservation, climate change, gene flow, habitat fragmentation, landscape ecology, landscape genetics, pollen dispersal, pollination, seed dispersal
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-148961DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.12742ISI: 000413341700018OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-148961DiVA: diva2:1163813
Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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