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Early Christian grave monuments, social networks and ecclesiastical organisation in 11th-century Sweden
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4536-0179
2017 (English)In: 18th Viking Congress Denmark, 6-12 August 2017: Abstracts - Paper and Posters, 2017, p. 25-26Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper explores the early Christian grave monuments (often called Eskilstunakistor) as a source for the social dynamics of 11th-century Sweden. These monuments formed an integral part of the Scandinavian runestone tradition, at the same time as they constitute the first churchyard memorials in the Götaland and south Svealand area. Based on an analysis of the stylistic design of the early Christian grave monuments it is possible to identify regional groups which have varying degrees of affinity with each other. I will argue that the ornamental design of the monuments can be regarded as a way of visual communication, where networks of associations are created by means of citation; linking places, burials and magnate families together. Thus, similarities and diversities in the design of funerary monuments convey information about the social networks of people erecting, or being buried beneath, these kinds of memorials as well as the scope of their power.

Moreover the designs of rune carved monuments are related to substantial differences in the Christianisation process, in the way Christian burial and commemoration was practiced during the eleventh century in Sweden. Different types of rune-inscribed grave monuments not only signify differences in elite networks, but also provide insight into how the Christianisation process was related to social and political structures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. p. 25-26
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-149892OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-149892DiVA, id: diva2:1164503
Conference
18th Viking Congress, Copenhagen, Denmark, August 6-12, 2017
Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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  • asciidoc
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