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Sleep duration, mortality and the influence of age
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
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Number of Authors: 62017 (English)In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 881-891Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Prior work has shown that both short and long sleep predict mortality. However, sleep duration decreases with age and this may affect the relationship of sleep duration with mortality. The purpose of the present study was to assess whether the association between sleep duration and mortality varies with age. Prospective cohort study. 43,863 individuals (64% women), recruited in September 1997 during the Swedish National March and followed through record-linkages for 13 years. Sleep duration was self-reported and measured using the Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire, and grouped into 4 categories: ae5, 6, 7 (reference) and 8 h. Up to 2010 3548 deaths occurred. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models with attained age as time scale were fitted to estimate mortality rate ratios. Among individuals < 65 years, short (ae5 h) and long (8 h) sleep duration showed a significant relationship with mortality (HR 1.37, 95% CI 1.09-1.71, and HR 1.27, 95% CI 1.08-1.48). Among individuals 65 years or older, no relationships between sleep duration and mortality were observed. The effect of short and long sleep duration on mortality was highest among young individuals and decreased with increasing age. The results suggest that age plays an important role in the relationship between sleep duration and mortality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 32, no 10, p. 881-891
Keywords [en]
Health, CVD, Cancer, Survival analysis, Aging
National Category
Geriatrics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-149863DOI: 10.1007/s10654-017-0297-0ISI: 000415032100004PubMedID: 28856478OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-149863DiVA, id: diva2:1164700
Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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Åkerstedt, TorbjörnGrotta, Alessandra
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