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Sex Differences in the Association Between Pain and Injurious Falls in Older Adults: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Aragon Institute for Health Research, Spain; Institute of Health Carlos III, Spain.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Number of Authors: 42017 (English)In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 186, no 9, p. 1049-1056Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigated whether there are sex differences in the association between pain and incident injurious falls. A total of 2,934 people (ages >= 60 years) from the population-based Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen (2001-2004) participated. Participants were followed up for 3 and 10 years for falls leading to hospitalization or outpatient care. Data were analyzed with flexible parametric survival models that adjusted for potential confounders. During the first 3 years of follow-up, 67 men and 194 women experienced an injurious fall, and over 10 years of follow up, 203 men and 548 women experienced such a fall. In men, the presence of pain, having pain that was at least mild, having pain that affected several daily activities, and having daily pain all significantly increased the likelihood of incurring an injurious fall during the 3-year follow-up period. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios ranged from 1.78 (95% confidence interval: 1.00, 3.15) for the presence of pain to 2.89 (95% confidence interval: 1.41, 5.93) for several daily activities' being affected by pain. Results for the 10-year follow-up period were similar. No significant associations were detected in women. Although pain is less prevalent in men than in women, its impact on risk of injurious falls seems to be greater in men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 186, no 9, p. 1049-1056
Keywords [en]
aged, falls, injury, pain, sex factors
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-150022DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwx170ISI: 000414354000007PubMedID: 28535169OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-150022DiVA, id: diva2:1167453
Available from: 2017-12-18 Created: 2017-12-18 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved

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Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health SciencesPublic Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

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