Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Relation of socioeconomic status to overweight and obesity: a large population-based study of Chinese adults
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Tianjin Medical University, China.
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 62017 (English)In: Annals of Human Biology, ISSN 0301-4460, E-ISSN 1464-5033, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 495-501Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: China has been going through significant changes in social and economical aspects and with great socioeconomic disparity in different regions. However, data on the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and obesity are not available in Tianjin, China.

Aim: This study aimed to investigate the association between SES and high adiposity among the adult population in Tianjin.

Subjects and methods: A total of 7351 individuals aged 20-79 were included in this study. Socioeconomic information was collected through an interview following a structured questionnaire. Waist circumference, body weight and height were measured following standard procedures. Overweight and obesity were defined according to the criteria of the Working Group on Obesity in China. Data were analysed using multinomial logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders.

Results: Stratified analysis showed that higher monthly income and education were related to decreased odds of abdominal overweight/ obesity in women, while high education was associated with increased odds of general overweight/obesity in men. Retirement increased the odds of abdominal overweight and obesity and non-manual work was associated with low odds of abdominal obesity in women.

Conclusions: SES was associated with general and abdominal overweight/obesity and sex may play a role in such an association.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 44, no 6, p. 495-501
Keywords [en]
Socioeconomic status, overweight, obesity, sex
National Category
Sociology Biological Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-151051DOI: 10.1080/03014460.2017.1328072ISI: 000416656500003PubMedID: 28482732OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-151051DiVA, id: diva2:1172059
Available from: 2018-01-09 Created: 2018-01-09 Last updated: 2018-01-09Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed
By organisation
Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI)
In the same journal
Annals of Human Biology
SociologyBiological SciencesPublic Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 3 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf