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Effects of late-night short-sleep on in-home polysomnography: relation to adult age and sex
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 27, no 4, article id e12626Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bedtime is frequently delayed by many factors in life, and a homeostatic response to the delay may compensate partly for increased time awake and shortened sleep. Because sleep becomes shorter with age and women complain of disturbed sleep more often than men, age and sex differences in the homeostatic response to a delayed bedtime may modify the homeostatic response. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of late-night short-sleep (3 h with awakening at about 07:00 hours) on in-home recorded sleep in men and women in two age groups (20-30 and 65-75 years). Results (N = 59) showed that late-night short-sleep was associated with an increase in percentage of N3 sleep and a decrease in percentage of rapid eye movement sleep, as well as decreases in several measures of sleep discontinuity and rapid eye movement density. Men showed a smaller decrease in percentage of rapid eye movement sleep than women in response to late-night short-sleep, as did older individuals of both sexes compared with younger. Older men showed a weaker percentage of N3 sleep in response to late-night short-sleep than younger men. In general, men showed a greater percentage of rapid eye movement sleep and a lower percentage of N3 sleep than women, and older individuals showed a lower percentage of N3 sleep than younger. In particular, older men showed very low levels of percentage of N3 sleep. We conclude that older males show less of a homeostatic response to late-night short-sleep. This may be an indication of impaired capacity for recovery in older men. Future studies should investigate if this pattern can be linked to gender-associated differences in morbidity and mortality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 27, no 4, article id e12626
Keywords [en]
extended waking, rapid eye movements, sleep deprivation, sleep loss
National Category
Neurology Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-151255DOI: 10.1111/jsr.12626PubMedID: 29082633OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-151255DiVA, id: diva2:1172456
Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2018-07-27Bibliographically approved

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Åkerstedt, TorbjörnLekander, MatsNilsonne, GustavD'onofrio, PaoloKecklund, GöranFischer, HåkanSchwarz, Johanna
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