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Understanding how access shapes the transformation of ecosystem services to human well-being with an example from Costa Rica
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0173-0112
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Number of Authors: 52017 (English)In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 28, p. 320-327Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increasingly, ecosystem services have been applied to guide poverty alleviation and sustainable development in resource-dependent communities. Yet, questions of access, which are paramount in determining benefits from the production of ecosystem services, remain theoretically underdeveloped. That is, ecosystem assessments typically have paid little attention to identifying real or hypothetical beneficiaries and the mechanisms by which benefits may be realized. This limits their ability to guide policy and interventions at the local scale. Through a qualitative mixed methods approach, this article analyzes how access to different aspects of the production of provisioning services is negotiated in Bribri communities (Costa Rica) of small-scale plantain farmers with alternative modes of agricultural production. The analysis considers access to land, labour, knowledge, tools, markets, and credit. Our analysis reveals how institutions of access are organized differently in traditional vs. conventional systems of agriculture and how these shape power dynamics and pathways to well-being. We conclude that understanding institutions regulating access to ecosystem services provides more useful insights for poverty alleviation than approaches that assume homogeneous access to benefits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 28, p. 320-327
National Category
Biological Sciences Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Social and Economic Geography
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URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-151167DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.09.010ISI: 000417087100007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-151167DiVA, id: diva2:1173012
Available from: 2018-01-11 Created: 2018-01-11 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved

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Mulvihill, Peter R.Peterson, Garry D.
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