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On the role of body size, brain size, and eye size in visual acuity
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
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Number of Authors: 52017 (English)In: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, ISSN 0340-5443, E-ISSN 1432-0762, Vol. 71, no 12, article id UNSP 179Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The visual system is highly variable across species, and such variability is a key factor influencing animal behavior. Variation in the visual system, for instance, can influence the outcome of learning tasks when visual stimuli are used. We illustrate this issue in guppies (Poecilia reticulata) artificially selected for large and small relative brain size with pronounced behavioral differences in learning experiments and mate choice tests. We performed a study of the visual system by quantifying eye size and optomotor response of large-brained and small-brained guppies. This represents the first experimental test of the link between brain size evolution and visual acuity. We found that female guppies have larger eyes than male guppies, both in absolute terms and in relation to their body size. Likewise, individuals selected for larger brains had slightly larger eyes but not better visual acuity than small-brained guppies. However, body size was positively associated with visual acuity. We discuss our findings in relation to previous macroevolutionary studies on the evolution of brain morphology, eye morphology, visual acuity, and ecological variables, while stressing the importance of accounting for sensory abilities in behavioral studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 71, no 12, article id UNSP 179
Keywords [en]
Sensory system, Eye size, Optomotor response, Guppies, Sex differences, Body size
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-151150DOI: 10.1007/s00265-017-2408-zISI: 000417949700010PubMedID: 29213179OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-151150DiVA, id: diva2:1174596
Available from: 2018-01-16 Created: 2018-01-16 Last updated: 2018-01-16Bibliographically approved

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Corral-López, AlbertoBuechel, Severine D.Kolm, NiclasKotrschal, Alexander
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