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School Collective Efficacy and Bullying Behaviour: A Multilevel Study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6606-2157
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 14, no 12, article id 1607Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As with other forms of violent behaviour, bullying is the result of multiple influences acting on different societal levels. Yet the majority of studies on bullying focus primarily on the characteristics of individual bullies and bullied. Fewer studies have explored how the characteristics of central contexts in young people's lives are related to bullying behaviour over and above the influence of individual-level characteristics. This study explores how teacher-rated school collective efficacy is related to student-reported bullying behaviour (traditional and cyberbullying victimization and perpetration). A central focus is to explore if school collective efficacy is related similarly to both traditional bullying and cyberbullying. Analyses are based on combined information from two independent data collections conducted in 2016 among 11th grade students (n = 6067) and teachers (n = 1251) in 58 upper secondary schools in Stockholm. The statistical method used is multilevel modelling, estimating two-level binary logistic regression models. The results demonstrate statistically significant between-school differences in all outcomes, except traditional bullying perpetration. Strong school collective efficacy is related to less traditional bullying perpetration and less cyberbullying victimization and perpetration, indicating that collective norm regulation and school social cohesion may contribute to reducing the occurrence of bullying.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 14, no 12, article id 1607
Keyword [en]
victimization, perpetration, peer aggression, collective efficacy, contextual; school
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-151930DOI: 10.3390/ijerph14121607ISI: 000423699400168PubMedID: 29261114OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-151930DiVA, id: diva2:1176186
Available from: 2018-01-20 Created: 2018-01-20 Last updated: 2018-03-05Bibliographically approved

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Olsson, GabriellaBrolin Låftman, SaraModin, Bitte
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Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

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