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Women's Role in the Alternative Culture Movements in Soviet Latvia 1960-1990
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2122-5941
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
2018 (English)In: The Palgrave handbook of women and gender in twentieth-century Russia and the Soviet Union / [ed] Melanie Ilic, London: Macmillan Publishers Ltd., 2018, p. 365-381Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the West, the radical social movements of the 1960s were expressed largely through political activism. In Eastern Europe, however, such movements necessarily took a different form. For example, one type of opposition to the Soviet regime was that of alternative cultures and lifestyles, which took a stand against the official ideology and culture. As with other countercultures in the Soviet Union, the impulse nucleus for many radical social movements often gravitated around a public meeting place that could provide the illusion of being separate from the all-pervasive state and societal power structures of the Communist regime. From the 1960s, two such spaces in Soviet Latvia were the café bar Kaza (Goat) and the open-air café Putnu dārzs (Bird Garden) in Riga Old Town, which became dynamic centres for the local youth movement. The leading participants in this informal movement were often intellectuals.

 

Another type of opposition to the Soviet regime can be identified in the formation of independent religious interest groups, a conscious action that was in direct opposition to the state's ideological objective of the elimination of religion through the promotion of scientific atheism. Informal local religious activism often had links to religious denominations and churches abroad, which only added to the maximal surveillance and persecution by state security organisations that was experienced also by the individuals within these religious movements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Macmillan Publishers Ltd., 2018. p. 365-381
Series
Palgrave Handbooks
Keyword [en]
Gender, Alternative, Culture
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-152159ISBN: 978-1-137-54904-4 (print)ISBN: 978-1-137-54905-1 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-152159DiVA, id: diva2:1177864
Available from: 2018-01-26 Created: 2018-01-26 Last updated: 2018-01-26Bibliographically approved

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Runcis, MaijaZalkalns, Lilita
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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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