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Global connectivity and cross-scale interactions create uncertainty for Blue Growth of Arctic fisheries
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
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Number of Authors: 62018 (English)In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 87, p. 321-330Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Arctic faces high expectations of Blue Growth due to future projections of easier access and increased biological productivity. These expectations are, however, often based on global and regional climate change projections and largely ignore the complexity of social-ecological interactions taking place across different temporal and spatial scales. This paper illustrates how such cross-scale interactions at, and across, different dimensions (e.g., ecological, socioeconomic and governance) can affect the development of Arctic fisheries; and potentially create uncertainties for future Blue Growth projections. Two Arctic marine systems, The Barents Sea and the Central Arctic Ocean (CAO), are used as focus areas. The former hosts productive fisheries and is mostly covered by the EEZs of Norway and Russia, while the latter is still mainly covered by sea-ice and is a high seas area with no multilevel governance system in place. The examples show that, both systems are affected by a number of processes, beyond the environmental change, spanning a wide range of dimensions, as well as spatial and temporal scales. To address the complexity of the Arctic marine systems calls for an increase in holistic scientific understanding together with adaptive management practices. This is particularly important in the CAO, where no robust regional management structures are in place. Recognizing how cross-scale dynamics can cause uncertainties to the current fisheries projections and implementing well-functioning adaptive management structures across different Arctic sub-systems can play a key role in whether the Blue Growth potential in Arctic fisheries is realized or lost.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 87, p. 321-330
National Category
Social and Economic Geography Political Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-152587DOI: 10.1016/j.marpol.2017.10.024ISI: 000419412200039OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-152587DiVA, id: diva2:1180663
Available from: 2018-02-06 Created: 2018-02-06 Last updated: 2018-02-06Bibliographically approved

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  • apa
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