Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Social networks of spotted hyaenas in areas of contrasting human activity and infrastructure
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. University of Pretoria, South Africa; University of Oviedo, Spain.
Number of Authors: 32018 (English)In: Animal Behaviour, ISSN 0003-3472, E-ISSN 1095-8282, Vol. 135, p. 13-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In group-living animals, the structure of social interactions among group members can have important consequences for individual fitness. Changes in resource abundance can influence social interactions with an expected weakening of social ties during times of resource scarcity. Although human activity and infrastructure often impose a disturbance on animal populations, they can also be a source of reliable resources that are relatively easy to access. We evaluated whether the social networks differed between four spotted hyaena, Crocuta crocuta, clans experiencing contrasting levels of human activity and infrastructure in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. The clan living in an area of high human activity and infrastructure had a less dense social network than the other clans, and the clan living in an area with limited human activity and infrastructure had shorter path lengths than the other clans, suggesting that it had more closely associated individuals. Our results did not support substantial differences between clans in the relative social network positions of animals from different age and rank classes. Contrary to our expectations, we suggest that anthropogenic resources may have weakened the social cohesiveness within spotted hyaena clans. We also argue that our study supports previous suggestions that there may be individual variation within broader classes of rank, age and sex in the position of individual animals in social networks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 135, p. 13-23
Keywords [en]
anthropogenic, Carnivora, graph theory, large carnivore, social interactions, social network, sociality
National Category
Psychology Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-152585DOI: 10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.10.027ISI: 000419600500003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-152585DiVA, id: diva2:1180669
Available from: 2018-02-06 Created: 2018-02-06 Last updated: 2018-02-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Cameron, Elissa Z.Dalerum, Fredrik
By organisation
Department of Zoology
In the same journal
Animal Behaviour
PsychologyBiological Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 13 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf