Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The Spillover Influence of Partner’s Education on Myocardial Infarction Incidence and Survival
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). University of Helsinki, Finland; Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Germany.
Show others and affiliations
2018 (English)In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 237-245Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Education is believed to have positive spillover effects across network connections. Partner’s education may be an important resource preventing the incidence of disease and helping patients cope with illness. We examined how partner’s education predicted myocardial infarction (MI) incidence and survival net of own education and other socioeconomic resources in Finland.

Methods: A sample of adults aged 40–69 years at baseline in Finland in 1990 was followed up for MI incidence and mortality during the period 1991–2007 (n = 354,100).

Results: Lower own and spousal education both contributed independently to a higher risk of MI incidence and fatality when mutually adjusted. Having a partner with basic education was particularly strongly associated with long-term fatality in women with a hazard ratio of 1.53 (95% confidence interval, 1.22–1.92) compared with women with tertiary level educated partners. There was some evidence that the incidence risk associated with basic spousal education was weaker in those with own basic education. The highest risks of MI incidence and fatality were consistently found in those without a partner, whereas the most favorable outcomes were in households where both partners had a tertiary level of education.

Conclusions: Accounting for spousal education demonstrates how health-enhancing resources accumulate to some households. Marriage between people of similar educational levels may therefore contribute to the widening of educational differences in MI incidence and survival.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 29, no 2, p. 237-245
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-152952DOI: 10.1097/EDE.0000000000000785ISI: 000424955200017OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-152952DiVA, id: diva2:1182362
Available from: 2018-02-13 Created: 2018-02-13 Last updated: 2018-03-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Martikainen, PekkaTorssander, Jenny
By organisation
Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS)The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI)
In the same journal
Epidemiology
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 11 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf