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Detection of Dementia Cases in Two Swedish Health Registers: A Validation Study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
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Number of Authors: 6
2018 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 61, no 4, p. 1301-1310Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Population-based health registers are potential assets in epidemiological research; however, the quality of case ascertainment is crucial.

Objective: To compare the case ascertainment of dementia, from the National Patient Register (NPR) and the Cause of Death Register (CDR) with dementia diagnoses from six Swedish population based studies.

Methods: Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) of dementia identification in NPR and CDR were estimated by individual record linkage with six Swedish population based studies (n = 19,035). Time to detection in NPR was estimated using data on dementia incidence from longitudinal studies with more than two decades of follow-up.

Results: Barely half of the dementia cases were ever detected by NPR or CDR. Using data from longitudinal studies we estimated that a record with a dementia diagnosis appears in the NPR on average 5.5 years after first diagnosis. Although the ability of the registers to detect dementia cases was moderate, the ability to detect non-dementia cases was almost perfect (99%). When registers indicate that there is a dementia diagnosis, there are very few instances in which the clinicians determined the person was not demented. Indeed, PPVs were close to 90%. However, misclassification between dementia subtype diagnoses is quite common, especially in NPR.

Conclusions: Although the overall sensitivity is low, the specificity and the positive predictive value are very high. This suggests that hospital and death registers can be used to identify dementia cases in the community, but at the cost of missing a large proportion of the cases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 61, no 4, p. 1301-1310
Keyword [en]
Alzheimer's disease, dementia, population-based registers, validation study, vascular dementia
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-153661DOI: 10.3233/JAD-170572ISI: 000423364400006PubMedID: 29376854OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-153661DiVA, id: diva2:1188253
Available from: 2018-03-07 Created: 2018-03-07 Last updated: 2018-03-07Bibliographically approved

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Karlsson, Ida K.
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