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Life-history responses to changing temperature and salinity of the Baltic Sea copepod Eurytemora affinis
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Number of Authors: 32018 (English)In: Marine Biology, ISSN 0025-3162, E-ISSN 1432-1793, Vol. 165, no 2, article id 30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To understand the effects of predicted warming and changing salinity of marine ecosystems, it is important to have a good knowledge of species vulnerability and their capacity to adapt to environmental changes. In spring and autumn of 2014, we conducted common garden experiments to investigate how different populations of the copepod Eurytemora affinis from the Baltic Sea respond to varying temperatures and salinity conditions. Copepods were collected in the Stockholm archipelago, Bothnian Bay, and Gulf of Riga (latitude, longitude: 58 degrees 48.19', 17 degrees 37.52'; 65 degrees 10.14', 23 degrees 14.41'; 58 degrees 21.67', 24 degrees 30.83'). Using individuals with known family structure, we investigated within population variation of the reaction norm (genotype and salinity interaction) as a means to measure adaptive capacity. Our main finding was that low salinity has a detrimental effect on development time, the additive effects of high temperature and low salinity have a negative effect on survival, and their interaction has a negative effect on hatching success. We observed no variation in survival and development within populations, and all genotypes had similar reaction norms with higher survival and faster development in higher salinities. This suggests that there is no single genotype that performs better in low salinity or high salinity; instead, the best genotype in any given salinity is best in all salinities. Genotypes with fast development time also had higher survival compared to slow developing genotypes at all salinities. Our results suggest that E. affinis can tolerate close to freshwater conditions also in high temperatures, but with a significant reduction in fitness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 165, no 2, article id 30
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-153656DOI: 10.1007/s00227-017-3279-6ISI: 000424326200001PubMedID: 29391649OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-153656DiVA, id: diva2:1188461
Available from: 2018-03-07 Created: 2018-03-07 Last updated: 2018-03-07Bibliographically approved

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