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Perfluoroalkyl acid levels in first-time mothers in relation to offspring weight gain and growth
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Germany.
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Number of Authors: 92018 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 111, p. 191-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigated if maternal body burdens of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) at the time of delivery are associated with birth outcome and if early life exposure (in utero/nursing) is associated with early childhood growth and weight gain. Maternal PFAA body burdens were estimated by analysis of serum samples from mothers living in Uppsala County, Sweden (POPUP), sampled three weeks after delivery between 1996 and 2011. Data on child length and weight were collected from medical records and converted into standard deviation scores (SDS). Multiple linear regression models with appropriate covariates were used to analyze associations between maternal PFAA levels and birth outcomes (n = 381). After birth Generalized Least Squares models were used to analyze associations between maternal PFAA and child growth (n = 200). Inverse associations were found between maternal levels of perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA), and birth weight SDS with a change of - 0.10 to - 0.18 weight SDS for an inter-quartile range (IQR) increase in ng/g PFAA. After birth, weight and length SDS were not significantly associated with maternal PFAA. However, BMI SDS was significantly associated with PFOA, PFNA, and PFHxS at 3 and 4 years of age, and with PFOS at 4 and 5 years of age. If causal, these associations suggest that PFAA affects fetal and childhood body development in different directions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 111, p. 191-199
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Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-153799DOI: 10.1016/j.envint.2017.12.002ISI: 000423441500020PubMedID: 29223808OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-153799DiVA, id: diva2:1189972
Available from: 2018-03-13 Created: 2018-03-13 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved

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