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Short-, Medium-, and Long-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins in Wildlife from Paddy Fields in the Yangtze River Delta
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
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Number of Authors: 7
2018 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 1072-1080Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) were added to Annex A of the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants in April, 2017. As a consequence of this regulation, increasing production and usage of alternatives, such as medium- and long-chain chlorinated paraffins (MCCPs and LCCPs, respectively), is expected. Little is known about the environmental fate and behavior of MCCPs and LCCPs. In the present study, SCCPs, MCCPs, and LCCPs were analyzed in nine wildlife species from paddy fields in the Yangtze River Delta, China, using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. SCCPs, MCCPs, and LCCPs were detected in all samples at concentrations ranging from <91-43000, 96-33 000, and 14-10000 ng/g lipid, respectively. Most species contained primarily MCCPs (on average 44%), with the exception of collared scops owl and common cuckoo, in which SCCPs (43%) accumulated to a significantly (i.e., p < 0.05) greater extent than MCCPs (40%). Cl-6 groups were dominant in most species except for yellow weasel and short-tailed mamushi, which contained primarily Cl-7 groups. Principal components analysis, together with CP concentrations and carbon stable isotope analysis showed that habitat and feeding habits were key factors driving CP accumulation and congener group patterns in wildlife. This is the first report of LCCP exposure in wildlife and highlights the need for data on risks associated with CP usage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 52, no 3, p. 1072-1080
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Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-153772DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.7b05595ISI: 000424851700017PubMedID: 29320169OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-153772DiVA, id: diva2:1192357
Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-03-22 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved

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