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The Andean Catch-22: Ethnicity, class and resource governance in Bolivia and Ecuador
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics, Institute of Latin American Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7088-971X
2018 (English)In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study deals with the tensions and contradictions between resourcegovernance, welfare policies, and the constitutionally recognized rights ofnature and the indigenous peoples in Bolivia and Ecuador. We haveidentified a certain reductionism in current debates on these issues andpropose a more systematic analytical focus on class and the class-ethnicityduality, as expressed in historical and contemporary indigenous struggles,and also confirmed via our ethnographic material. Drawing on the doublebind as expressed in Joseph Heller’s Catch-22 wherein the protagonists facesituations in which they do not have any choice to achieve a net gain, thisarticle centres on how national governments have to choose between theprotections of rights – in this case ethnic and environmental rights – andwelfare provision financed by extractive revenues. From the perspective ofecologically concerned indigenous actors, the Catch-22 is articulated in thechoice or compromise between universal welfarism on the one hand, andethno-environmental concerns on the other hand. The article draws primarilyon ecosocialist arguments and on indigenous-culturalist perspectives onGood Life (Sumak Kawsay or Vivir Bien). A central finding is the existence ofawareness among involved actors – oppositional movements andgovernment authorities – that the Catch-22 quandary and joint class-ethnicconcerns are unavoidable ingredients in their discourses, struggles, andunderstandings of Good Life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018.
Keyword [en]
Ecosocialism, Sumak Kawsay/ Vivir Bien, class-ethnicity, resource governance, indigenous peoples
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Political Science; Political Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-154454DOI: 10.1080/14747731.2018.1453189OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-154454DiVA, id: diva2:1193817
Available from: 2018-03-27 Created: 2018-03-27 Last updated: 2018-04-05

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CiteExportLink to record
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