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Lonelier than ever? Loneliness of older people over two decades
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Dalarna University, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Number of Authors: 3
2018 (English)In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 75, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To live with feelings of loneliness has negative implications for quality of life, health and survival. This study aimed to examine changes in loneliness among older people, both with regard to prevalence rates, and socio-demographic, social and health-related correlates of loneliness. This study had a repeated cross-sectional design and was based on the nationally representative Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD). Analyses of trends in loneliness covered the years 1992, 2002, 2004, 2011 and 2014, and included people aged 77 years or older (n = 2 572). Analyses of correlates of loneliness covered 2004 and 2014, and included people aged 70 years or older (n = 1 962). Logistic regression analyses were conducted with findings presented as average marginal effects. Contrary to what is often assumed, there has been no increase in loneliness among older people over time (1992-2014). Regression analyses for 2004 and 2014 showed that social and health-related correlates were more strongly associated with loneliness than socio-demographic correlates. Psychological distress was most strongly associated with loneliness, followed by widowhood. Most associations between the correlates and loneliness were stable over time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 75, p. 96-103
Keyword [en]
Loneliness, Trend, Risk factor, Predictor, Sweden
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences Geriatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-154823DOI: 10.1016/j.archger.2017.11.004ISI: 000426105800015PubMedID: 29220739OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-154823DiVA, id: diva2:1196886
Available from: 2018-04-11 Created: 2018-04-11 Last updated: 2018-04-11Bibliographically approved

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Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health SciencesGeriatrics

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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