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Tracing Improving Livelihoods in Rural Africa Using Local Measures of Wealth: A Case Study from Central Tanzania, 1991–2016
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5163-6007
2018 (English)In: Land, ISSN 2073-445X, Vol. 7, no 2, article id 44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We studied livelihood changes and poverty dynamics over a 25-year period in two villages in central Tanzania. The villages were, from the early 1990s and 2000s, strikingly poor with between 50% and 55% of families in the poorest wealth groups. 25 years later much has changed: people have become substantially wealthier, with 64% and 71% in the middle wealth groups. The new wealth had been generated locally, from farming, particularly of sunflowers as a cash crop. This goes against a conventional view of small-scale farming in Tanzania as being stagnant or unproductive. The area of land farmed per family has increased, almost doubling in one village. People have made money, which they invest in mechanised farming, improved housing, education of their children, livestock, and consumer goods. Improved infrastructure and local entrepreneurs have played key roles in the area’s transformation. Locally identified wealth rankings showed that most villagers, those in the middle wealth groups and above, can now support themselves from their land, which is a notable change to a time when 71% and 82% in each village respectively depended on casual labour for their survival. This change has come at a cost to the environment. By 2016, the village forests have largely gone and been replaced by farms. Farmers were concerned that the climate was turning drier because of deforestation. Studying the mundane—the material used in roofs, the size of farms, and so on made it possible to trace and understand the radical transition the area has experienced.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 7, no 2, article id 44
Keywords [en]
Longitudinal studies, assets, livelihoods, rural entrepreneurs, Tanzania
National Category
Social and Economic Geography Sociology
Research subject
Human Geography; Social Anthropology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-155097DOI: 10.3390/land7020044ISI: 000436556500005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-155097DiVA, id: diva2:1196919
Note

This article belongs to the Special Issue "Livelihood and Landscape Change in Africa: Future Trajectories for Improved Well-Being under a Changing Climate".

Available from: 2018-04-11 Created: 2018-04-11 Last updated: 2018-07-23Bibliographically approved

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