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Early burst in body size evolution is uncoupled from species diversification in diving beetles (Dytiscidae)
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Number of Authors: 4
2018 (English)In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 979-993Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Changes in morphology are often thought to be linked to changes in species diversification, which is expected to leave a signal of early burst (EB) in phenotypic traits. However, such signal is rarely recovered in empirical phylogenies, even for groups with well-known adaptive radiation. Using a comprehensive phylogenetic approach in Dytiscidae, which harbours similar to 4,300 species with as much as 50-fold variation in body size among them, we ask whether pattern of species diversification correlates with morphological evolution. Additionally, we test whether the large variation in body size is linked to habitat preference and whether the latter influences species turnover. We found, in sharp contrast to most animal groups, that Dytiscidae body size evolution follows an early-burst model with subsequent high phylogenetic conservatism. However, we found no evidence for associated shifts in species diversification, which point to an uncoupled evolution of morphology and species diversification. We recovered the ancestral habitat of Dytiscidae as lentic (standing water), with many transitions to lotic habitat (running water) that are concomitant to a decrease in body size. Finally, we found no evidence for difference in net diversification rates between habitats nor difference in turnover in lentic and lotic species. This result, together with recent findings in dragonflies, contrasts with some theoretical expectations of the habitat stability hypothesis. Thus, a thorough reassessment of the impact of dispersal, gene flow and range size on the speciation process is needed to fully encompass the evolutionary consequences of the lentic-lotic divide for freshwater fauna.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 27, no 4, p. 979-993
Keyword [en]
body size, divergence time, early burst, habitat, insect, phylogeny
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-156008DOI: 10.1111/mec.14492ISI: 000428797100013PubMedID: 29334415OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-156008DiVA, id: diva2:1204998
Available from: 2018-05-09 Created: 2018-05-09 Last updated: 2018-05-09Bibliographically approved

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